Make Yourself Immune to Secondhand Stress

j0178793This is an excellent article about how to keep your head when everyone else is losing theirs.

Source: Make Yourself Immune to Secondhand Stress

Workplace Culture is THE Key to Creating Better Employee Well-Being

“Without a thriving workplace culture, organizations may suffer from employee disengagement, stagnant business practices, uninspired products and services, and decreased financial performance.”

Teen Girl (15-17) Biting into a Green Apple --- Image by © Royalty-Free/Corbis

Here the author very accurately addresses how workplace culture and employee well-being effectively go hand-in-hand.

How well is your organization addressing these issues?

Workplace Culture is THE Key to Creating Better Employee Well-Being | TLNT.

How to Fall Back in Love with Your Job

“One of the toughest things about a rut is acknowledging that you are in one,” says Daniel Gulati, a tech entrepreneur and author.

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Even exciting jobs have boring days. And when you’ve been doing the same tasks, going to the same office, and working with the same people day in and day out, you’re bound to fall into a rut on occasion. When that happens, how do you recognize what’s happening and counteract it? What can you do to revive your interest in your work?

Here’s some great information from Gulati, and esteemed University of Michigan researcher and professor, Gretchen Spreitzer about how to do just that, including a couple of very useful case examples:

How to Fall Back in Love with Your Job – HBR.

A Scientific Guide to Saying “No”: How to Avoid Temptation and Distraction

I love this quick and easy way to use the research:monkey

A Scientific Guide to Saying “No”: How to Avoid Temptation and Distraction – – The Buffer Blog.

Pronouns Matter when Psyching Yourself Up – HBR

Some people seem to have an amazing ability to stay rational no matter what.

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They efficiently make good, clear decisions while the rest of us waste energy doing things like panicking about upcoming tasks, ruminating pointlessly, or refusing to move on from our failures.

If you are not always one of those people, read about this interesting research by Ethan Kross from the University of Michigan and Ozlem Ayduk from UC-Berkeley about a simple change can make the difference between showing up like a cool-headed rationalist or a very worried and stressed out (but typical) human.

Pronouns Matter when Psyching Yourself Up – HBR.

In addition, here’s a link to a podcast of my past radio interview with Dr. Kross, “Can You Teach Yourself to Be Wiser.”

Increase the Odds of Achieving Your Goals by Setting Them with Your Spouse – HBR

This is an interesting post!

Consider, if you aren’t doing this already, making your spouse a more clearly defined member of your “team” as you seek to attain professional and private goals. This article suggests some great ways of formalizing the process, so that it doesn’t get lost in shuffle of the day-to-day “busyness”, and, so that the value of your support to each other is maximized.

How do you do this? What can you add? I’d love to hear your ideas.

Couple Smiling at One AnotherIncrease the Odds of Achieving Your Goals by Setting Them with Your Spouse – HBR.

Time, Energy and People – Your Three Biggest Assets | Finance Lights

Where is your focus?

Are you focusing your time, thoughts and energy in the right areas? In the right proportions?

This article addresses this so effectively, it could be a “must read” every morning for those of us who are striving for excellence. What are your thoughts?

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Time, Energy and People – Your Three Biggest Assets | Finance Lights.

5 Ways to Get Better at Asking for Help – HBR

Here’s a great post from the Harvard Business Review, with ideas that not only apply to work and career, but in all areas of your life.

I know from experience, both mine, and that of many of my clients, many of us could get better at this….

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5 Ways to Get Better at Asking for Help – HBR.

Kindness is evolutionarily wired into us

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Take a look at this fascinating, (short), video about the neurobiology and physiology of compassion and kindness.

Daecher Keltner from the University of California-Berkeley discusses new research coming from his lab and others that explains the scientific brain-wiring that makes this happen.

(Really worth watching!)

Kindness is evolutionarily wired into us.

The Scientific Pursuit of Happiness | Science | Smithsonian

What does the Dalai Lama have to teach psychologists about joy and contentment?

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/the-scientific-pursuit-of-happiness-100375676/#feCz1pFelxpQztqe.99
http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
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The Scientific Pursuit of Happiness | Science | Smithsonian.